Mental Excellence in the Digital Age

Sustaining excellence in your personal and professional life requires energy, lots of energy. Science and medicine continues to provide evidence that maintaining a proper balance of good diet, rest, exercise and stress reduction can help maximize your energy levels. But how do we get to that balance and maintain it?

At the core of it all are the attitudes, decisions and perspectives that we focus on each and every day. Deciding to eat right or exercise regularly are decisions we make and those are a result of the regular communication that we have with ourselves. I call that, The Circle of Mental Excellence.

I’ve spent the last ten years researching people of note, throughout history, from Roman emperors like Hadrian to Benjamin Franklin to Steve Jobs. The common denominator in each one is that they all have a set of principles or guiding mantra to keep mentally aligned on a day-to-day basis. Much like the Samurai of Japan or Knights Templar, they have what I call a Personal Code.

Theodore Roosevelt for example was very vocal about his “Doctrine of a strenuous life”. He truly believed that physical and mental adversity not only tests ones character but is essential to building it. Benjamin Franklin had is principles of frugality and initiative. Steve Jobs believed in creating things that were both artful and useful. These people were not perfect, in fact these principles likely rose from each of them to offset significant internal conflicts. Those personal codes, however, became an internal compass that allowed them to find their True North under the toughest conditions.

 

dress-fdn-protocol

Mental health, if not addressed, can have debilitating side effects — some of which may be detrimental to your business.

Source: Managing Your Mental Health as an Entrepreneur

“Perceive and understand that which is not visible from the outside.”
-Miyamoto Musashi

Habits, Mastery & Sustaining Excellence

mastery

It takes at least 45 days of deliberate and focused repetition to create a new habit. Mastery of a skill, on the other hand, requires a set of fundamental habits that relate directly to said skill. Those habits must be refined and developed over time, some estimate at least 10,000 hours but much of that will depend on the person and the quality of practice.

Sustaining Excellence is a strategy that incorporates all of this on a larger scale. It can have several categories including Mental, Physical, Skills, Group or Institutionalized Excellence. The guiding principle is that Habit, Mastery and Sustained Excellence are all cyclical in nature. It’s neither journey nor destination but continual process.

Goodreads | Review of The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

cropped-cropped-cropped-cropped-dsc04824-copy112.jpg

Perhaps one of the most relevant books of the last decade. In an age of information overload, connected devices and unprecedented technological change, there gives rise to whole new series of potential habits. This book provides sound evidence to the personal, economic and social implications that these new habits bring.

This book also provides scientific evidence to what I call, “Personal Gravity“; Developing habits of mental excellence leads to new habits of physical excellence, which leads to habits of skills excellence, which leads to habits of excellence at the team and organizational level. That’s the core of the ENMEI Formula.

Source: Goodreads | Bryan Nann (Phoenix, AZ)’s review of The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

 

12609433

The Differences Between Successful People and Unsuccessful People | LinkedIn

Here is a good article from Dave Kerpen on habits for cultivating that Circle of Mental Excellence.

The Differences Between Successful People and Unsuccessful People | LinkedIn.

Slide3
Mental Excellence is one of five core concepts in ENMEI. Circular because habits need to be constantly revisited and cultivated in order to master.